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Is Your Water Heater Temperature Too Hot?

 

On a cold winter morning, sometimes there’s nothing better than a hot shower to get you warmed up and ready for your day. But if you’re not careful, the hot water can be a little too hot — for you and your children, and also for your wallet.

Here’s how to make sure you keep you and your family from scalding temperatures when the temptation to move that hot water knob a little further to the left hits. Set your water heater’s temperature to 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This will prevent you and your little ones from accidental harm when taking a bath or shower, or even washing your hands.

Some manufacturers do recommend 140 degrees, but if you have young children in your home, it’s especially important keep your temperature setting at 120 degrees or slightly below. Further, lowering the temperature can decrease your bill by an estimated $10-30 annually for each 10 degree decrease in temperature.

But what about your ensuring your water is hot enough to sanitize dishes in your dishwasher? No worries, that’s why dishwashers have heat boosters. Dishwasher manufacturers actually point to monthly water bill savings as a benefit of heat boosters because you don’t have to keep your entire house at a higher temperature to make sure your dishes are clean.

Are there any cons? The only risk of lowering the water heater temperature is may allow bacteria to build up with the lower temperature. However, most people in general good health do not have to worry. If you have a suppressed immune system or chronic respiratory problems consider keeping it at 140. If you have small children, or are elderly, make sure to add mixing valves at each sink or shower which will help prevent you from scalding accident.

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Have more questions? Call us—we’d love to help! You can reach the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day. If water runs through it – We Do It!

 

What Not To Flush

 

While some toilet clogs are accidents – maybe a toy or other object was flushed accidentally – others are from lack of knowledge regarding what is appropriate to flush and what is not. Below, you’ll find a thorough list of items that are frequently flushed that can cause serious damage to your plumbing system or even the environment.

Feminine products – There’s a reason that commercial buildings’ restrooms are lined with, “Please do not flush feminine hygiene products” signs. The damage these can do can be very costly to business and homeowners alike.

Cooking grease/food – If it’s grease or oil or food, it doesn’t go in the toilet. Period.

Baby wipes/Wet wipes/Cleaning pads – It’s tempting. They look like toilet paper, but they’re not. Reality is that wet wipes are not designed to disintegrate like toilet paper.

Dental Floss – Floss is not biodegradable and can knot and tangle to cause seriously clogs.

Q-tips and Cotton Balls – They look like they should flush easily, but cotton balls can build up and clog easily, especially in the bends of the pipes.

Bandaids – The non-biodegradable plastic bandaids are made from means a potential nightmare for your plumbing lines as well as the environment.

Diapers – Though you can flush their contents down the toilet, a flushed diaper is a big no-no. If you actually manage to flush it, it’s next to impossible for it not to become lodged at some point in the plumbing lines.

Cat Litter – There are multiple reasons why this is a bad idea. From the toxicity of the litter to the potential contamination of your water supply by your cat’s feces, take the time to put it in the trash instead.

Prescription medication – So many homeowners look for a “safe” way to get rid of old medications. And while “out of sight” is safe for little ones, flushing medications is definitely not safe for ground water supply or wildlife.

Paper Towels – Paper towels are just not made to be flushed. While they may make it out of the toilet bowl when you flush them, the likelihood that they will cause a headache for you in the future is significant.

Cigarette butts – If you flush your cigarette butts, you’re creating potential toxic issues for septic systems and ground water supply.

To keep your toilet and plumbing lines in good working order, the best thing to do is flush toilet paper only. Anything else has the potential to create costly and sometimes embarrassing visits from your plumber.

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Have more questions? Call us—we’d love to help! Call the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day. If water runs through it – We Do It!

Chlorinated or Salt Water Pool?

While chlorinated pools have dominated the marketplace for decades, salt water pools have found their way beyond luxurious spas into the backyards of many Americans. If you are considering which type of pool to install in your back yard, below you’ll find some frequently asked questions about salt water pools that may help you as you explore your options.

What exactly is a salt water pool? It’s a type of pool that uses the process of salt water chlorination via a chlorine generator. (You may also hear the generator called a salt cell, a salt generator or a salt chlorinator.) Essentially, rather than dumping chlorine into your pool directly, you are feeding pool salt to the chlorine generator which produces chlorine as it is needed.

How does a salt water pool stay clean? The chlorine generator uses electrolysis via dissolved salt to produce hypochlorous acid (HClO) and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), which are the sanitizers traditionally used in chlorinated pools.

Why is a salt water pool better for your skin than a chlorinated pool if they both contain chlorine? The salt water pool’s generator creates chlorine only on an as-needed-basis, therefore, there is typically significantly less chlorine in the water. And lower chlorine levels translates into happier skin and eyes.

What are some benefits of a salt water pool? Besides the fact that they are easier on the skin and eyes, you don’t have to store or transport chlorine, which is a more unpleasant substance to handle than salt. In addition, owners often report enjoying the soft-water feel of these pools.

Which requires less maintenance, a salt water or chlorinated pool? Hands down, a salt water pool requires less maintenance because you don’t have to deposit chlorine into the pool regularly. For example, if you have to leave your home for a few weeks, it’s doubtful you’d have to worry about returning to a pool laced with green algae. That said, you must still keep a somewhat regular check on the salt levels, etc.

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Have more questions? Call us—we’d love to help! Call the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day. If water runs through it – We Do It!

Do You Have a Break in Your Sewer Line?

Unless a homeowner is a plumbing professional or has taken time to specifically learn about plumbing issues, it can be difficult to know when your home has a potentially serious plumbing problem.

One such issue is a breaking or broken sewer line. If you begin to notice the following issues around your home, it’s a good idea to take those signs seriously to prevent further or severe damage.

Easily clogged drains. While every home is bound to deal with clogged drains every now and then, drains that consistently clog in various areas of the home–even after attempts to clear them–could be a good sign that it’s time to call a professional to do some investigative work.

Slow draining sinks, tubs, dishwasher, etc. If you’ve previously cleared a sink or tub drain and it continues to drain slowly, or worse, it stops draining altogether, it may be time to call a professional.

 Soggy spots on your lawn. When a pipe in your sewer line breaks, the water will escape into the surrounding soil, thus creating a wet spot in your lawn. If you step into the wet area, it sometimes will make a “squish” sound.

Increase in your water bill. An average home’s water bill may fluctuate $10-15 dollars a month. However, if you find that your water bill has increased significantly and you have no specific reason to point to, it’s worth having a professional explore the issue.

Foul odors. If you are noticing frequent sewer gas odor in your home, it’s likely you have a problem, especially if the odor is combined with any of the above signs.

Are you breathing a sigh of relief, or have these items confirmed that you may have an issue? If it’s the latter, don’t wait to call a professional. Especially with plumbing and sewer lines, it’s much easier to fix a small problem before it becomes a bigger problem resulting mold or pest problems.

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Have more questions? Call us—we’d love to help! Call the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day. If water runs through it – We Do It!