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Fall Home Maintenance Part Three: Your Lawn

There’s no question that home maintenance is critical to retaining the value of your home. And a vital part of your home’s curb appeal is your lawn and landscape. To make sure your yard is prepared to look its best next spring, you’ll need to take a few steps.

Keep watering and mowing. Your lawn will love you for this. As it prepares to go dormant for winter, its soaking up all the water and nutrients it can to support it through the winter.

Aerate. By allowing oxygen, water and fertilizer into the soil, aerating will help keep your lawn looking beautiful. If you don’t have an aerator of your own, you can often rent one from a local home and garden store, like Home Depot or Lowes.

Fertilize. Want a thick, green lawn next spring? Experts say mid to late fall is the best time for fertilizing. This will help your grass grow deeper, stronger roots.

Control weeds. Apply an herbicide in early fall to ensure you’re not dealing with weeds come Spring.

Rake leaves. As the leaves fall, take the time to remove them quickly so that they don’t sit too long on your healthy lawn. Wet leaves from rain or morning dew create a prime environment for mold and fungus growth.

Fill in bald spots. Everyone one has a spot or two that just needs a little extra help. Grab your rake and scratch up the bald spots, then follow with a lawn repair mixture, which is a combination of grass seed, quick start fertilizer and organic mulch.

Plant flowering bulbs. For beautiful spring tulips and day lilies, now is the time to plant. So go pick your favorites from the garden store and start planting!

Cut your grass short. Towards the end of fall, begin cutting your grass short to help your grass look it’s best throughout the winter while minimizing chances for snow mold growth.

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 Have more questions? Call us—we’d love to help! Call the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day. If water runs through it – We Do It!

Preventing Damage to Your Foundation

 

When was the last time you thought about the health of your home’s foundation? Unfortunately, until there’s a problem, many homeowners don’t give it much consideration. However, the state of your foundation can directly impact how well your home ages.

In order to keep your foundation strong, there are a few things that you can do. First, the soil grading around your home should decline away from your home. This prevents pooling of water around your foundation. If you find that the grading angles toward your home, call a professional to assess your options.

Next, your downspouts and gutters are critical components in the battle to keep your foundation healthy, yet they are often taken for granted. Their job is to move rain and roof water away from your home rather than allowing it to sink into the ground at the base of your foundation.

And, with fall approaching, it’s important to plan a time to remove the leaves from your gutters. Why? Gutters full of leaves keep the water from running through the gutters to the downspouts, taking the water away from the home. Instead, the water will overflow from the gutters directly to the base of your foundation, potentially creating serious issues.

Especially during a drought, keep the soil immediately your home moist enough such that it does not dry out completely. If clay, for example, dries out and then is soaked in a rain shower at a later time, the clay is apt to expand and put tension on the foundation wall.

Next, plant those large shrubs and trees a slight distance away from your home. By doing so, you can help prevent the competition for water between the plants roots and the soil around the perimeter of your home. If the roots of your shrubs are competing with the moisture needed to keep the soil moist around your home, you may identify damage to the foundation via cracks in your dry wall and windows and doors that won’t open and close easily.

In conjunction with all of the above, scheduling regular plumbing and foundation inspections with a professional is always a good idea.

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Have more questions? Call us—we’d love to help! Call the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day. If water runs through it – We Do It!

How to Maintain a Rain Barrel

 

Over the past several years rain barrels have become extremely popular.  It’s a new take on an old idea that catches rainwater to be used to water flower gardens and landscapes.  Just buy a rain barrel, set it up, and enjoy the benefits of a greener landscape, and happy plants.  Simple, huh?  While rain barrels are a great way to recycle water, there are some things to know to keep your rain barrel in good shape.

One of the first things to consider is where to use the water from your rain barrel.  You know the water collected is not suitable for you or your pets to drink, but is it OK to use everywhere else in your landscape?  If you know your roof material contains no asbestos, tar and gravel, or is not treated cedar shakes, then it should be safe for your landscape and flower gardens.

However, some prefer not to use water from their rain barrels for watering fruit or vegetable garden since there is limited research on pollutants in the gathered water.  And, if you have your roof cleaned or treated for pests you should unhook your rain barrel for a couple of weeks to avoid contaminating your water.

Another thing to remember, like with all things, your rain barrel will require some maintenance.    To help, don’t allow water to stand in your barrel for more than 5 to 7 days.  For a rain barrel in direct sunlight, algae growth can be an issue.  If so, empty the barrel, wash with a solution of 3/4 cup of bleach per one gallon of water, and rinse well.  Remember to dispose of the bleach solution in a household drain to avoid damaging your lawn or garden areas.

Summer is the season for mosquitoes, and your rain barrel can become a breeding area for them.  Placing a fine mesh screen to the lid of the rain barrel can prevent adult mosquitoes from getting in and laying eggs.  Otherwise, you will need to empty your barrel every week so mosquitoes don’t have time to breed.  Check monthly and remove any debris that accumulates on the lid.  Clean your barrel on a regular basis, and check over-flow hose and connections to make sure all is working properly.

Having a rain barrel is a great way to conserve your water usage.  Keeping it clean and in good working order will help you get the most out of your rain barrel, and benefit both the environment and your landscape.

Have more questions? Call us—we’d love to help! Call the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day. If water runs through it – We Do It!