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Planning for a Kitchen Remodel

 

Once you’ve decided to undertake a kitchen remodel, that’s when the fun begins. It’s time for your dreams to become reality. So do you know what you really want from your new kitchen? And do you know who you want to do the work?

Before talking to a contractor or designer, it’s a good idea to have an idea of what you want or need most from the remodel. Is this purely an aesthetic change that you’re desiring? Or do you need more storage space? Does the configuration work for your family? Or does the kitchen need to be larger? It’s important to answer these high level questions before you get into details like colors, tile preferences and even appliances.

Once you have clarity around these big questions, you’ll need to hire a contractor or a designer. Often times, contractors have a designer that they prefer to work with, and likewise a designer may have a contractor that he or she trust implicitly. So if you know a contractor or a designer that you love, go with the person you know and they can work with you to find the right professional to supplement the team.

Next, let’s be real, it’s just smart to set aside a “Surprise Fund” for unexpected issues during the remodel. If you find mold, or worse, a pipe bursts, that’s going to be extra money out of your pocket. While it’s hard to find extra money for these situations, it’s better to have at least a small rainy-day fund than none at all.

Last but not least, determining the best time of the year for your kitchen remodel can make all the difference in the world in how smoothly and quickly the project will proceed. Do you plan to take a long vacation this summer? Would it be better to take this on during the school year or when the kids are out for summer? Are you expecting a child? Do you know your work is going to be crazy during a certain season? Do you have a deadline because of a special event like the holidays, an anniversary or wedding?

You are the only person who can answer these questions, that’s why it’s good to discuss them with contractor or designer so you can create a timeline that works well for everyone.

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Have more questions? Call us—we’d love to help! Call the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day. If water runs through it – We Do It

 

 

 

 

 

Considering Building a Pool? 

It’s July. It’s hot. And having your own pool is beginning to sound like a great idea. While some homeowners prefer public or community pools, others desire a pool in their own backyard. If you find that you’ve begun calculating yardage as you gaze at your backyard while doing dishes, you may be one of them. To get beyond dreaming and begin assessing your options, below are some key considerations to get the ball rolling in the right direction.

What is YOUR primary purpose for the pool? While this may seem like a ridiculous question, you should ask yourself how you see the pool being used. Were you or are your kids competitive swimmers? If that’s the case, you may want the pool long enough to do laps. Is it primarily for you and your husband? Or do you see a future full of birthday parties with countless kids and teens? The answers to these questions will begin to help you assess the size, depth and shape of pool you may want or need, as well as the amenities you’ll require.

Do you have the space? After getting an idea of the size and shape of the pool you want, you’ll need to align that information with your available space to determine the best location for your pool. Keep in mind that most rectangular pools are about twice as long on one side as they are on the other, with an average depth of around 5.5 feet. Typically, pools measure 10 x 20, 15 x 30, and 20 x 40.

How much will it cost to install a pool? According to homeadvisor.com, the cost of installing a pool in 2017 can range from $20,000 to $80,000, with the average cost landing around $40,000 depending on the type of pool, the amenities included and landscaping choices. That said, keep in mind, you’ll need to develop an annual maintenance budget for chemicals or salt, etc.

Is your family ready for a pool?  Are you retiring and looking forward to having a personal retreat just a few steps away? Or are you newly married and planning a family. Regardless of your season of life, a pool can be a lot of fun but it can also be a lot of work so be prepared to set aside time and money to maintain and make repairs.

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Have more questions? Call us—we’d love to help! Call the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day. If water runs through it – We Do It!

Plumbing in a Tiny Home (Part 2)

 

Our previous blog discussed some of the choices to get water into your tiny home.  But, how do you handle getting rid of your waste water?  First, take into account the difference between black water and grey water.  Black water is the sewer waste from your toilet, while grey water is from other uses (i.e., showers, sinks, washing machines, etc.).  Most areas have strict regulations on the disposal of waste water, so check with your local state and county offices for the necessary guidelines.  Now, let’s talk about getting grey water out of your tiny home.

Disposal of Grey Water – Grey water contains soap, bacteria, food and grease, household cleaning products, and anything else we put down our sink drains.  Although clean enough to reuse for watering shrubs and plants, grey water cannot be drained into lakes, streams or ponds.  Plants can filter and break down the components in grey water, but draining into fresh water can pollute the water and harm fish and wildlife.  Here are some ways to properly dispose of your grey water.

  1. Hooking into a public sewer system is the simple way to deal with grey water.  If you plan to keep your tiny home stationary, this can be the perfect choice for you.
  2. The next simplest plan is placing a container under your sink and shower drain to catch the grey water.  Then it can manually be emptied onto surrounding trees, shrubs and plants.
  3. You can also set up a water tank that catches grey water then slowly drains from a hose in the bottom of the tank.  The tank will need to be slightly elevated to help with drainage.
  4. The tank system can also be turned into a longer irrigation system if you plan for a permanent tiny home location.  By using multiple lengths of hose you can have a system that drains the water between several planting beds.

Some really like the idea of tiny home living.  But in order to do it right, and prevent problems later on, you need to give the proper attention to the big areas like plumbing.  Our next blog is going to finish out your tiny home plumbing with finding the best ways to deal with Black Water.

Have more questions? Call us—we’d love to help! Call the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day. If water runs through it – We Do It!

Upgrade Your Coffee — With a Built in Coffee System

 

Many people wouldn’t know how to get their day started without a “cup of joe.”  But, making that first cup happen can be a little challenging sometimes. How many times have you stumbled around the kitchen, half asleep, trying to fill the coffee pot and get that wonderful aroma going to wake you up? Wouldn’t it be wonderful not to hassle with filling the coffee pot with water?  Well, take heart, because there are real solutions for you on the market today.

You might think that only commercial coffee makers, or very expensive ones (over the $10,000 mark), can have its own plumbing system. But, that’s not the case anymore. There are now more affordable coffee makers for the home that are plumbed in to make your morning routine easier and faster.

Research is important to find the exact built-in coffee maker you want. Since there is a variance in price, you will want to look around to get the best deal with the features you want. Some makers come with built-in water filters, which may be an important feature if you have hard water. Other specialized features are built-in coffee grinder, separate hot water dispenser, auto on/off, and auto rinse/clean.

The next thing is to consider the location for your unit. If you are remodeling it may be easier to make the transition to a built-in unit. Your cabinetry can then be designed to have specific cabinet allotted for your unit. The plumbing and electrical can also be done before cabinet install.

However, if you just want to upgrade your kitchen with a built-in coffee unit there are still ways to make this happen. Brew Express makes a unit that sits on your countertop, while it connects to your water supply just like your refrigerator. Brewmatic has one that mounts under an upper cabinet allowing you to keep your countertop free unless brewing a pot of coffee.  Both  units still require some plumbing and electrical, so speak with a professional installer on how to retrofit to your counter space.

Making life more efficient is important to everyone. So, finding ways to make your morning routines simpler and smoother is always a plus. Having a built-in, plumbed-in coffee maker might be just the right step to improving your mornings in this new year — and get you that caffeine fix even faster.

Have more questions? Call us — we’d love to help! Call the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day. If water runs through it – We Do It!

Heat Your Water Fast! by Go Green Plumbing

Who doesn’t get tired of waiting for the hot water when you turn on the shower or faucet?  Ever add up those minutes in a week to see how much time is wasted watching perfectly good water go down the drain?  Speaking of “water going down the drain”, studies show that billions of gallons of water are wasted each year by households nationally while waiting for the hot water to show up.  But what can we do to change this?  None of us really love taking cold showers, unless its 95º and our air conditioning is out. hotwatersystem_std

Well, there is a solution.

Installing a hot water recirculation system will get the hot water to where you need it without the long wait.  Rather than waiting on your home’s water pressure to get the hot water to you, a hot water recirculation system uses a pump to move the water quickly from the water heater to your sink or shower.

There are two types of systems to review. A dedicated, or demand, loop recirculating system has a hot water line looped throughout the house near each plumbing fixture.  At each fixture a short pipe connects the loop to the hot water valve.  A circulation pump is installed on a pipe near the water heater that keeps hot water continually circulating through this loop.  So when you turn on your faucet or shower, you have hot water within seconds.

The second system is an integrated loop system.  This system requires a pump that is installed at the water heater and a special manifold under the plumbing fixture farthest from the water heater.  This system returns cooled water sitting in the hot water line back to the water heater through the cold water lines.  This can raise the temperature of the cold water slightly, but will return to normal temperature quickly.

Some systems keep water recirculating constantly, or can be set up on a thermostat or timer.  Since there are different options available, talk with your plumber to determine the best and most energy efficient for your household.  Then enjoy the experience of no longer “waiting around” for hot water, and feel good that you are contributing to saving energy and our water supply.

Have more questions? Call us- we’d love to help! Call the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day.  If water runs through it – We Do It!

Cleaning with natural, home-made household cleaners by Go Green Plumbing

Recently we discussed some of the problems with using harsh household cleaners. So, if we want to use less harmful cleaners, where do we find them or can we make them ourselves? All we need to do is take a short step back in time to see what our mothers and our grandmothers used for cleaning supplies. And, you may be surprised to find, that you have some of these in your cupboards and pantries right now.download

White vinegar, baking soda and Borax? Who of us hasn’t heard of these items? Well, white vinegar isn’t just for cleaning your coffee maker, and baking soda has way more uses than keeping your refrigerator smelling fresh. White vinegar can be used as an all purpose cleaner for kitchens and baths. Don’t like the smell? Try adding tea tree or citrus essential oils. Not only do they help neutralize the vinegar smell, but they also have great antibacterial and antimicrobial benefits which make them great to use on kitchen and bathroom surfaces.

Baking soda combined with vinegar can be used as a drain cleaner. Mix a 1/2 cup vinegar and 1/2 cup baking soda and pour into your drain. Follow up with a 1/4 cup baking soda washed down your drains every week or so to prevent buildup and clogs. Making a paste of baking soda and water can remove stains from shower grout and be used as an oven cleaner. It can also be used to freshen carpet, laundry, trash cans and more. If you start looking you will find that it can be a great household cleaner to have on hand.

But what about Borax? Some might think that it would be unsafe, but it is a naturally occurring mineral that isn’t absorbed through the skin, doesn’t accumulate in the body and is safe for the environment. You also might not know of its many cleaning benefits. It can be used as a carpet cleaner, toilet bowl cleaner, tub and shower cleaner, rust remover, and much more.

Along with the above items, essential oils are gaining in popularity for their many health benefits and cleaning uses. Besides adding a wonderful scents to our homes, they are great germicides, antibacterials, antiseptics and degreasers. Using these in home-made cleaners will keep our homes germ free and smelling like the outdoors. So, take a step outside your norm, do a little research, and you’ll find that you can make your cleaning process a healthier one for you, your home, and the environment.