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Plumbing Checklist for Homebuyers

 

Believe it or not, prime house buying season is just around the corner and many sellers are already sprucing up their homes to be sold. If you’re planning to buy a home this spring, you’re probably getting a few things in order as well.

While things like identifying a lender is a critical piece of the home buying process, there are a few seemingly smaller things that can make a big difference in your home buying success. For example, using a plumbing checklist for each home viewing is one item that can save you grief down the road.

Why? Because plumbing issues aren’t always obvious. But with a keen eye and a little bit of active observation, you’ll be able to glean a great deal about your future plumbing systems.

Flush Every Toilet in the Home. Listen for gurgling sounds, slow draining toilets and toilets that run too long.

Check the Pipes. Low water pressure is the last thing you want when you’re stepping into your morning shower. So make sure to check the size of each home’s pipes. Look for a minimum of ¾ inches from the water source to the home and a minimum of ½ inch to faucets.

Turn on Each Faucet. Just as you flushed each toilet, turn each sink, bath and shower faucet on to better gauge the type of water pressure you can expect.

Inspect the Water Heater. Locate the water heater and check for any corrosion or other visible issues. Make sure to ask for the service record and year of anticipated replacement.

Spend Time in the Basement. While most homebuyers don’t tend to spend too much time in the basement. It can tell you a lot about the health of the home. Do you see any water damage? Leaky pipes? Repairs to plumbing systems and fixtures that look a little too much DIY?

Look for Lead Piping. Now that consumers are aware of the dangers of lead, it’s in your best interest to stay away from any home that has a lead piping system; that is, unless your budget allows for replacing all of the piping.

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Have more questions? Call us—we’d love to help! Call the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day. If water runs through it – We Do It!

Is Your Water Heater Temperature Too Hot?

 

On a cold winter morning, sometimes there’s nothing better than a hot shower to get you warmed up and ready for your day. But if you’re not careful, the hot water can be a little too hot — for you and your children, and also for your wallet.

Here’s how to make sure you keep you and your family from scalding temperatures when the temptation to move that hot water knob a little further to the left hits. Set your water heater’s temperature to 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This will prevent you and your little ones from accidental harm when taking a bath or shower, or even washing your hands.

Some manufacturers do recommend 140 degrees, but if you have young children in your home, it’s especially important keep your temperature setting at 120 degrees or slightly below. Further, lowering the temperature can decrease your bill by an estimated $10-30 annually for each 10 degree decrease in temperature.

But what about your ensuring your water is hot enough to sanitize dishes in your dishwasher? No worries, that’s why dishwashers have heat boosters. Dishwasher manufacturers actually point to monthly water bill savings as a benefit of heat boosters because you don’t have to keep your entire house at a higher temperature to make sure your dishes are clean.

Are there any cons? The only risk of lowering the water heater temperature is may allow bacteria to build up with the lower temperature. However, most people in general good health do not have to worry. If you have a suppressed immune system or chronic respiratory problems consider keeping it at 140. If you have small children, or are elderly, make sure to add mixing valves at each sink or shower which will help prevent you from scalding accident.

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Have more questions? Call us—we’d love to help! You can reach the professionals at Go Green Plumbing at 336-252-2999 for service 7 days a week/24 hours a day. If water runs through it – We Do It!